Courses & Syllabi

Course descriptions and syllabi for some of the courses I have taught:

Philosophy 3016: Political Theory [ON-SITE] – Syllabus
Philosophy 3016: Political Theory [ONLINE] – Syllabus
Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University

In this upper-level course we primarily examine important themes in the tradition of Western, Anglo-American political thought from the 19th century through the late 20th century. Major topics include political liberalism, libertarianism, cosmopolitanism, post-colonialism/anti-colonialism, feminist political theory, anarchism, liberation politics, and related fields.  Sub-topics include political obligations, sovereignty, freedom, equality, power, community, property, capitalism, socialism, Marxism, social relations, and democracy, as well as interventionism, and a wide array of philosophical and practical questions.  Political theorists we will study include Mill, Marx, Nietzsche, Schmitt, Du Bois, MacKinnon, Rawls, Fanon, and Dussel, as well as a few late-twentieth century scholars. Evaluation will consist of many short analytical writing assignments, exams, and participation in course activities. Intended course outcomes include enhanced abilities to compare and evaluate justifications posed by different theories, improved analytical writing skills, and broadened understanding to a range of historical and contemporary concerns relevant to politics.

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Philosophy 1304: Morality & Justice – Syllabus
Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University

This course addresses select moral and political problems that will necessarily arise in a diverse world.  To that end, course materials explore various theories of morality and ethics as well as some of the political theories we might use to solve particular problem.  Students will be prompted to consider how you function as a moral-political agent in a society of moral-political agents with experiences, values, assumptions and conclusions that differ from your own.

This course is indispensable if you wish to continue in moral and political philosophy, political science, communications, public policy, or law, as it will make a major critical contribution to your study of those fields.  Remember that the goal of philosophy is the development of critical thinking skills and abilities in search of various co-existing wisdoms and truths, not necessarily harmony or certainty.

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Philosophy 111: Knowledge, Reality, and the Human Condition – Syllabus
Radford University

This is an introductory course in Metaphysics, Epistemology, and human experience.  We will work through various texts from different periods in Western thought to address questions such as:

  • What are some of the different ways to understand and explain reality?
  • How do I know what is real and what is merely appearance, error, or illusion?
  • How do different theorists explain knowledge?
  • How do I find out who I am and how I relate to the world around me?

In order to pursue these goals, we will be reading and exploring the theories and relative values of various philosophical texts throughout history.  This course is indispensible if you wish to continue in moral and political philosophy, political science, or law, as it will make a major critical contribution to your study of those fields.  Remember that the goal of philosophy is the development of critical thinking skills and abilities in search of various co-existing wisdoms and truths, not necessarily harmony or certainty. – Syllabus

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Philosophy 2304: Global Ethics – Syllabus
Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University

This course addresses select moral and political problems that will necessarily arise in a diverse world.  To that end, course materials explore various moral and political theories can we use to solve these problems, and students will be prompted to consider how you function as a moral-political thinker in a society of moral-political thinkers whose experiences, values assumptions and conclusions differ from your own.  Some of the readings in this course overlap with those typically found in PHIL 1304: Morality & Justice, while others go deeper or explore new ground. 1304 is not a prerequisite, but if you have taken it you will find some of the reading more accessible.

This course is indispensible if you wish to continue in moral and political philosophy, political science, or law, as it will make a major critical contribution to your study of those fields.  Remember that the goal of philosophy is the development of critical thinking skills and abilities in search of various co-existing wisdoms and truths, not necessarily harmony or certainty.

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Adult Education & Higher Education Leadership 499/599: Advanced Organizing Theory & Practice – Syllabus
Oregon State University

 This course is a collective experiment in studying theory and implementing practice. Course materials – readings, media, lectures, papers, projects, etc. – are designed to include both a balance of theoretical perspectives and ideas, and practicing skills to effectively organize for social change. Success in this course depends upon your willingness to take the course material seriously, placing your assumptions and biases under scrutiny through your own critical thinking and engaging with others sincerely in critical discourse, and by considering new ways of understanding the world that may, and almost certainly will, require you to develop new ways of living your life in the world.

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Adult Education & Higher Education Leadership 406: Organizing for Social Change – I/Syllabus & II/Syllabus
Oregon State University

The purpose of the course is to provide opportunities for you to explore student leadership opportunities in ASOSU through co-curricular and academic experiences. Interns will be able to learn experientially about practical methods for Community Organizing, Direct-Action organizing and Grassroots Organizing to: 1) Win real victories that improve the lives of students at OSU; 2) Help OSU students become more aware of their own collective and individual power; 3) Alter the relations of power to benefit OSU students.

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Bio-Behavioral Health 251: Advanced Sexual Orientation Peer Education/Straight Talks – I – Syllabus
The Pennsylvania State University

This course will afford students opportunities to develop presentation skills and critical consciousness about sexual/affectional orientations and gender identities/expressions across different cultures. We will engage this subject matter through exploration of social issues related to heterosexism, homophobia, racial/ethnic diversity, social justice and group facilitation skills.

Through instruction, readings, discussions, interactive exercises, participation, self-reflection and guided teaching experiences, students will have opportunities to achieve the course objectives as outlined below. As a result, students will be prepared to present educational sessions on sexual/affectional orientations and gender identities/expressions, as well as facilitate educational presentations on related topics.